Driving a school minibus FAQs2021-03-01T22:54:42+00:00
Driving a School Minibus FAQs
Do I need a D1 to drive a minibus2021-03-02T11:21:57+00:00

You can drive a minibus without a D1 or D1 entitlement but there are some restrictions.

A full D1 licence requires medical and eyesight checks as well as a theory and practical test. You may have D1 entitlement on your car licence if your licence was issued before January 1997. This entitles you to drive a minibus without the conditions required for those with a standard car licence.

If you are driving for a commercial company that is operating under a PSV Operators’ licence you need a full D1 licence as well as further training. If the minibuses are being run by a not-for-profit company or one that has charitable status they operate under a Section 19 Permit which is issued by the DVSA, in lieu of an operator’s licence.

Under a Section 19 Permit drivers must meet certain conditions to drive a minibus on a standard B car licence.
they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
no trailer is being towed
where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.
For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

If drivers want to drive a minibus with a GVW of over 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment), drive abroad, tow a trailer or be paid to drive a minibus, under a Section 19 Permit, they need D1 entitlement.

If you are a teacher and are driving a minibus without D1 entitlement, make sure you meet the conditions listed above and you can drive a minibus on a standard car licence.

How old do you have to be to drive a minibus?2021-03-01T22:13:33+00:00

You need to be 21 to drive a minibus.

To drive a minibus on a car licence, under a Section 19 Permit, one of the conditions you must meet is to be over 21. You must also have been driving for more than two years.

To apply for a D1 licence to drive a minibus over 3.5 tonnes, the minimum age requirement is 21.

Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public. So, if you are a teacher or member of staff you need to be 21 or over to drive any size vehicle, including an 8 passenger car, that some might consider a minibus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can I drive a minibus on a car licence?2021-03-01T22:17:55+00:00

Yes, you can drive a minibus on a car licence, but you need to make sure the vehicle you are driving has a weight of under 3.5 tonnes (if your licence was issued after January 1997 and doesn’t include D1 (101) entitlement) and that the vehicle has a Section 19 Permit.

Under a Section 19 Permit you can drive a minibus with a MAM (Maximum Authorised Mass) or GVW (gross vehicle weight) of under 3.5 tonnes on a standard car licence. There is an additional allowance for specialist equipment for disabled passengers of 750kg but this allowance is ONLY for that equipment.

Vehicles under this weight limit, that can be driven on a car licence include the new Euro 6 Ford Transit factory-built 12 seat minibus and the Euro 5 Ford Transit 14 seat minibus or some converted 15 seat minibuses, such as the Citroen Relay.

Under a Section 19 Permit there are some conditions drivers must meet when driving a minibus on a car licence.

  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

 If drivers want to drive a minibus with a GVW of over 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment) they must have a D1 entitlement. If your driving licence was issued before January 1997 and has 101 in the D1 column on the back of your licence, then you can drive minibuses without the weight restriction. Otherwise, you will need to take the D1 driving test to get that entitlement.

Can I drive a 8 seater minibus on a car licence2021-03-01T22:17:37+00:00

You can drive an 8 seater minibus on a car licence with no other considerations, if you are doing so privately. It is not considered to be a small bus, or minibus. That size of vehicle is classed as a ‘small vehicle’ adapted to carry 8 passengers or fewer.

There are conditions and restrictions on driving these types of vehicles if it is not your private vehicle. If you are driving for an organisation or as part of your employment there may be some restrictions on who can drive these vehicles, such as needing to be over 21 and having had your licence for over two years, but you still only need a standard car licence.

An organisation that accepts any sort of payment for providing transport to passengers must hold either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence and driver must hold the full D1 licence and complete annual CPC training. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles can’t be used to carry members of the general public. Section 19 Permit replaces the need for a PSV Operators and/or PHV licence.

Under a Section 19 Permit drivers of small vehicles, such as teachers or school staff, adapted to carry 8 or fewer passenger must be over 21 and have held a full standard car licence for at least 2 years. Drivers can be paid for driving a small vehicle under a section 19 permit.

You are likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole.

Vehicles adapted to carry 8 or fewer passengers are only considered to be Public Service Vehicles if passengers are being charged separate fares in the course of the business of carrying passengers. This means that if you use a small vehicle you must charge separate fares. The vehicle must not be available for hire as a whole. You’re likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole. In these cases you should contact your local council, which is responsible for licensing private hire vehicle operations, for advice.

 

What licence do I need to drive a minibus for hire and reward?2021-03-01T22:17:05+00:00

You need at least D1 entitlement on your standard car licence or a full D1 licence to drive a minibus for hire and reward under a Section 19 Permit, or a full D1 licence and further CPC training if you are driving a minibus for a commercial company looking to profit from their minibus operations and carry the general public.

Under a Section 19 Permit you can drive for reward or hire with D1 (101) entitlement included on a standard car licence issued before 1st January 1997. On the back of your licence in the D1 row you will see (101). This entitles you to drive a minibus under a Section 19 Permit and be paid to do so. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public.

If you are being paid to drive for a commercial company you will need a full D1 licence, that requires medical and eyesight, theory and practical tests. Commercial companies need to apply for both a minibus provisional entitlement, also known as a passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) licence and a public service vehicle (PSV) operator licence. Drivers will also need to complete 35 hours of additional CPC training.  You must have the full Driver CPC if you drive a lorry, bus or coach as the main part of your job. You usually need to pass 4 tests to get it, unless you have ‘acquired rights’ because of your existing driving experience.

You do not need the full Driver CPC if you do not want to drive for a living, for example you want to drive for a hobby or carry passengers or goods non-commercially for personal use.

For more information visit. https://www.gov.uk/become-lorry-bus-driver

Licence to drive a minibus2021-03-01T22:19:30+00:00

The type of licence you need to drive a minibus depends on whether the vehicle is being driven for profit, whether you are being paid to drive and on the weight of the vehicle.

Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public.

There are several conditions drivers must meet to drive a minibus on a standard car licence under a Section 19 Permit.

  • they are over 21
  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

So, if you are a volunteer driver, who is over 21 and has driven for over 2 years you can drive a minibus under 3.5 tonnes on a standard car licence under a Section 19 Permit.

If you cannot meet the conditions above you need a D1 licence or D1 entitlement on your car licence. If your standard car licence was issued before 1st January 1997 it will have D1 (101) entitlement on that licence. If not, you need to take a theory and practical test to obtain a D1 licence.  With a D1 entitlement you can drive a vehicle over 3.5 tonnes, and you can be paid to do so, even under a Section 19 Permit.

Companies profiting from transport or carrying members of the general public must have either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence and a full D1 licence and CPC training is required for all drivers.

What licence do I need to drive a minibus?2021-03-01T22:21:08+00:00

There are two types of licence you can drive a minibus with; a standard (B) car licence and a D1 licence. Knowing which one you need depends  1. the weight of the vehicle 2. whether you are being paid to drive and 3. whether the vehicle is being driven for profit.

A standard (B) car licence allows you to drive a minibus operated not-for-profit, under a Section 19 Permit, as long as you meet certain conditions, the main ones being; that drivers are over 21 and have been driving for more than 2 years, that the gross weight (GVW) of the vehicle is under 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with specialist equipment) and that drivers receive no payment or other consideration.

The GVW or MAM is the weight of a vehicle including the maximum load (passengers, driver, luggage) that can be carried safely when it is being used on the road. This is also known as the permissible maximum weight and it is what dictates whether drivers need D1 entitlement.

You can find the weight, sometimes also called the plated weight on the chassis plate or VIN plate that is usually in the door frame, under the bonnet or in a front foot well. It looks like the image below. The MAM is always the second largest weight, in this case, 4100.

Minibus Weight

If you cannot meet these conditions you need a D1 licence or D1 entitlement on your car licence. If your standard car licence was issued before 1st January 1997 it will have D1 (101) entitlement on that licence. If not, you need to take a theory and practical test to obtain a D1 licence.  With D1 entitlement you can drive a vehicle over 3.5 tonnes and you can be paid to do so, even under a Section 19 Permit.

Companies profiting from transport or carrying members of the general public must have either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence and a full D1 licence and CPC training is required for all drivers.

For more information on the conditions required to drive a minibus under a Section 19 Permit visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

 

Can I drive a 9 seater on a car licence?2021-03-01T22:25:24+00:00

You can drive a 9-seater on a standard car licence if you are doing so privately, as that size of vehicle is considered to be a ‘small vehicle’ adapted to carry 8 passengers or fewer. It is not considered to be a small bus, or minibus.

There are conditions and restrictions on driving these types of vehicles if it is not your private vehicle. If you are driving for an organisation, or as part of your employment, there may be some restrictions on who can drive these vehicles, such as needing to be over 21 and having had your licence for over two years, but you still only need a standard car licence.

An organisation that accepts any sort of payment for providing transport to passengers must hold either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence. A Section 19 Permit replaces the need for a PSV or PHV licence. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. There is no need for a PSV or PHV licence with a Section 19 Permit. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public.

Under a Section 19 Permit drivers of small vehicles, such as teachers or school staff, adapted to carry 8 passengers or less must be over 21 and have held a full standard car licence for at least 2 years. Drivers can be paid for driving a small vehicle under a Section 19 Permit.

You are likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole.

Vehicles adapted to carry 8 or fewer passengers are only considered to be Public Service Vehicles if passengers are being charged separate fares in the course of the business of carrying passengers. This means that if you use a small vehicle you must charge separate fares. The vehicle must not be available for hire as a whole. You’re likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole. In these cases you should contact your local council, which is responsible for licensing private hire vehicle operations, for advice.

What licence do I need to drive a minibus?2021-03-01T22:26:42+00:00

You need a standard car licence to drive a minibus, not for reward or hire, that has a GVW under 3.5 tonnes (other conditions apply).

A standard car licence with D1 entitlement allows you to drive a minibus that has a GVW over 3.5 tonnes and/or is being used for reward or hire. You need a full D1 licence with CPC to drive a minibus for a commercial company looking to profit from their minibuses.

D1 entitlement can be inherited and obtained. If your driving licence was issued before 1st January 1997 it will have 101 in the D1 column on the back of your licence, this is an inherited entitlement. If you do not have this entitlement you will need to take the D1 theory and driving test to get that entitlement.

You can drive a minibus with a standard car licence without D1 entitlement if the organisation that runs the vehicle has a Section 19 Permit. These are issued by the DVSA to organisations not looking to profit from the transport of their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public.

There are several conditions drivers must meet to drive a minibus on a standard car licence under a Section 19 Permit.

  • they are over 21
  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

 

Companies profiting from transport or carry members of the general public must have either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence and a full D1 licence and further training is required for all weights of vehicles.

Can I drive a 17 seater minibus?2021-03-01T22:27:36+00:00

If you have a standard car licence, are over 21 and have been driving for more than two years, and are not driving for reward or hire, you can drive a 17-seater minibus with a GVW of under 3.5 tonnes under a Section 19 Permit.

If you have a full D1 licence or a D1 (101) entitlement on your licence, because your licence was issued before 1st January 1997, you can drive a 17-seater minibus without having to meet the conditions below, outlined for standard car licence holders.

Under a Section 19 Permit there are some conditions drivers must meet when driving a minibus with a car licence.

  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

Finding the GVW or MAM of your 17 seater minibus

The MAM is the weight of a vehicle including the maximum load (passengers, driver, luggage) that can be carried safely when it is being used on the road. This is also known as the gross vehicle weight (GVW) or permissible maximum weight and it is what dictates whether drivers need D1 entitlement.

You can find the weight, sometimes also called the plated weight on the chassis plate or VIN plate that is usually in the door frame, under the bonnet or in a front foot well. It looks like the image below. The MAM is always the second largest weight, in this case, 4100.

Minibus Weight

Who can drive a minibus?2021-03-01T22:29:46+00:00

Anyone with a standard car licence can drive a minibus under a Section 19 Permit as long as they meet certain conditions;

  • they’re 21 or older
  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used

 

If the minibus is over 3.5 tonnes or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment you can only drive this vehicle if you have D1 entitlement. Either by an inherited D1 (101) entitlement on licences issued before 1st January 1997 or by taking the full D1 theory and practical test.

 

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

 

Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. This means that if you are a volunteer driver or not driving for reward or hire you can drive a minibus.

 

There is some legal ambiguity as to what constitutes reward or hire when it comes to minibus drivers who are driving minibuses on a car licence as part of their employment, like teachers for example (this does not apply where the driver has D1 entitlement).

 

The NASWUT National Union of Teachers states: ‘Whether a teacher may be deemed to be driving a minibus for hire and reward because they are being paid a salary as a teacher is unclear, and advice on this point is contradictory, except in Northern Ireland.

 

The NASUWT strongly asserts that, particularly but not exclusively due to the ambiguity around the hire/reward status, the full D1 licence is the minimum requirement, and a car licence is insufficient in all circumstances. If schools wish to train minibus drivers to D1 level, the costs of any training and testing for the D1 licence must be covered in full by the employer.’

 

www.nasuwt.org.uk/advice/health-safety/minibus-guidance.html

 

Can you drive a minibus on a car licence?2021-03-01T22:30:49+00:00

Under a Section 19 Permit you can drive a minibus with a MAM (Maximum Authorised Mass) or GVW (gross vehicle weight) of under 3.5 tonnes on a standard car licence.

There is an additional allowance for specialist equipment for disabled passengers of 750kg but this allowance is ONLY for that equipment.

Vehicles under this weight limit, that can be driven on a car licence include the new Euro 6 Ford Transit factory-built 12 seat minibus and the Euro 5 Ford Transit 14 seat minibus, or some converted 15 seat minibuses, such as the Citroen Relay.

Under a Section 19 Permit there are some conditions drivers must meet when driving a minibus on a car licence.

  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

 If drivers want to drive a minibus with a GVW of over 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment) they must have D1 entitlement. If your driving licence was issued before January 1997 and has 101 in the D1 column on the back of your licence, then you can drive minibuses without the weight restriction. Otherwise, you will need to take the D1 driving test to get that entitlement.

Can I drive a 9 seater minibus on a car licence?2021-03-01T22:31:28+00:00

You can drive a 9-seater minibus on a standard car licence as that size of vehicle is considered to be a ‘small vehicle’ adapted to carry 8 passengers or fewer, not including the driver. It is not considered to be a minibus.

There are conditions and restrictions on driving these types of vehicles if it is not your private vehicle. If you are driving for an organisation or as part of your employment there are some restrictions on who can drive these vehicles, such as needing to be over 21 and having had your licence for over two years, but you still only need a standard car licence.

An organisation that accepts any sort of payment for providing transport to passengers must hold either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public.

Under a Section 19 Permit drivers of small vehicles adapted to carry 8 or fewer passengers must have held a full licence authorising the driving of vehicles in category B (cars) for at least 2 years and they must be 21 or over. Drivers can be paid for driving a small vehicle under a section 19 permit.

You’re likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole.

Vehicles adapted to carry 8 or fewer passengers are only considered to be Public Service Vehicles if passengers are being charged separate fares in the course of the business of carrying passengers. This means that if you use a small vehicle you must charge separate fares. The vehicle must not be available for hire as a whole. You’re likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole. In these cases you should contact your local council, which is responsible for licensing private hire vehicle operations, for advice.

Can I drive a minibus?2021-03-01T22:32:47+00:00

If you are not being paid to drive or are driving for a charity or not-for-profit organisation, have a standard car licence, are over 21 and have been driving for over two years you can drive a minibus under a certain weight.

If you have a full D1 licence, or a D1 101 entitlement on your licence (check the back of licences issued before 1st Jan 1997) you can drive a minibus with less restrictions.

Charities or not-for-profit organisations can operate their minibuses under a Section 19 Permit which allows drivers to drive on a standard car licence if the following conditions are being met.

  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

If drivers want to drive a minibus with a weight over 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment) they must have D1 entitlement. If your driving licence was issued before January 1997 and has 101 in the D1 column on the back of your licence then you can drive minibuses without the weight restriction. Otherwise, you will need to take the D1 driving test to get that entitlement.

An organisation that accepts any sort of payment for providing transport to passengers must hold either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public. A Section 19 Permit replaces the need for a PSV or PHV licence.

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