FAQs2022-05-27T09:28:28+00:00

FAQs

Here are all our FAQS which you can also find on our various Mini Series. Please use the filters to look at specific categories

How much does a 15-passenger van weigh?2022-05-26T13:17:24+00:00

A 15 passenger Citroen minibus, converted from a van, has a GVW of 3500kg so can be driven on a standard car licence.

Can I drive a converted minibus bus on a car licence?2022-05-26T13:17:39+00:00

The same rules apply to converted minibuses as to factory-built minibuses. If you are not driving for hire or reward, under a Section 19 Permit, you can drive a converted minibus (9-16 seats) on a car licence if the GVW is 3500kg or under. There is an additional allowance of 750kg that must be used exclusively for specialist equipment for disabled passengers

3.5-tonne van and minibus weight limits2022-05-26T13:18:06+00:00

You can drive a van with a GVW (gross vehicle weight) of up to 3.5 tonnes on a standard car licence with no D1 entitlement. If you have D1 (101) on your licence (issued before Jan 1st 1997) or have passed the full D1 test, you can drive a van or small truck up to 7.5 tonnes and tow a vehicle and trailer combination of up to 8250kg. The same weight limit applies to panel and window vans converted to minibuses under a Section 19 Permit – other conditions apply.

What are the DVLA weight limits for minibuses?2022-05-26T13:17:57+00:00

The weight limit for driving minibuses on a car licence is 3500kg, with an additional 750kg allowance for specialist equipment for disabled passengers. If the GVW exceeds 3500kg (or 4250kg with specialist equipment) you will require D1 entitlement on your driving licence – either inherited or obtained by taking the D1 test.

Who to ask about minibus weights and licences2022-05-26T13:18:17+00:00

The DVSA is the best authority to consult for an answer on minibus weight and licences. You can contact the technical officers directly via phone: 0300 123 9000 or email technicalofficers@dvsa.gov.uk

How to find the GVW of a minibus?2022-05-26T13:18:25+00:00

The GVW is stated on the VIN plate of your vehicle that can be found on a metal plate inside the driver’s door or in the passenger footwell. The GVW is the second largest number on that plate.

finding the gross vehicle weight of your minibus

Finding the gross vehicle weight of your minibus

What is the GVW of a minibus?2022-05-26T13:18:33+00:00

GVW stands for Gross Vehicle Weight, it is also called the MAM) Maximum Authorised Mass) and is the maximum weight a fully laden minibus (passengers, luggage and fuel) can reach. To avoid overloading your minibus be aware of the kerbside or unladen weight and then the payload, the amount of additional weight you’re adding. These combined weights should not exceed the GVW.

What is a Minibus Light?2022-05-26T13:18:45+00:00

Minibus lights is the name given to some minibuses weighing under 3.5 tonnes that can be driven on a car licence. These are converted panel or window vans specifically designed for schools to avoid the full D1 driver test. Although legal they are usually missing heavier safety features such as side-impact bars.

17 seat minibuses you can drive on a car licence?2022-05-26T13:18:58+00:00

There are no vehicle manufacturers that make a 17 minibus you can drive on a car licence as the GVW needs to be 3500kg or under. Converted panel vans, known as lightweight minibuses, offer more options for vehicles under the 3500kg GVW limit.

Can I drive a Peugeot L4 H2 minibus on a standard car licence?2022-05-26T13:19:08+00:00

Because the Peugeot L4 H2 minibus has a GVW of 4005kg you will need D1 entitlement to drive it. The GVW is 505kg over the 3500kg allowance for standard B licence under a Section 19 Permit.

Can I drive a Citroen L4 H2 minibus on a standard car licence?2022-05-26T13:19:15+00:00

No, you need D1 entitlement to drive a Citroen L4 H2 minibus because the GVW or plated weight is 4005kg – which is 505kg over the 3500kg allowance for standard B licence under a Section 19 Permit.

Do I need a special licence to drive a minibus?2022-05-26T13:19:37+00:00

Under a Section 19 Permit you don’t need a special licence to drive a minibus provided you are not driving for hire and reward and the minibus’ GVW is 3500kg or under (other conditions apply). Minibuses over 3.5 tonnes require D1 entitlement to drive them – this can be inherited (on licences issued before Jan 1st 1997) or you can take the full D1 test.

What Ford Minibus can I drive without a D12022-05-26T13:20:07+00:00

The largest new Ford minibus you can drive without D1 entitlement is a Euro 6 12 seat Ford transit that weighs 3500kg. The Euro 5 Ford Transit 14 seat minibus (pre-2014) also weighs 3500kg but the newer Euro 6 14 seat minibus has a GVW of over 3500kg and needs D1 entitlement.

What is D1 entitlement?2022-05-26T13:20:22+00:00

D1 entitlement allows you to drive minibuses over 3.5 tonnes in weight (4250kg with the allowance for specialist equipment). You will either have inherited D1 entitlement on your licence if it was issued before 1 January 1997 or you will have to take the full D1 driving test.

Where to find D1 101 entilement on drivers licence

Where to find D1 101 entitlement on a driver’s licence.

How big a minibus can I drive?2022-05-26T13:20:37+00:00

If you don’t have D1 entitlement, because your licence was issued after Jan 1st 1997, you can drive a minibus with 9-16 seats up to a GVW of 3500kg (4250kg with specialist equipment), as long as you’re not driving for hire or reward. If you have D1 entitlement or a full D1 licence you can drive heavier vehicles, and be paid to do so. Conditions apply, see the .gov website for more details.

Is a lightweight minibus a converted van?2022-05-09T09:47:53+00:00

Lightweight minibuses are converted panel or window vans so that the converters can keep the weights below 3500kg to allow the vehicles to be driven without D1 entitlement. An additional allowance of 750kg is allowed for permanent specialist equipment for disabled passengers. This allowance can not be attributed to anything else.

What 17 seat minibus can be driven on a car licence?2022-05-09T09:50:30+00:00

No manufacturer makes a 17 seat minibus with a gross vehicle weight (GVW) of under 3500kg. Converted vans such as the Citroen or Peugeot L4 H2 have a pre-conversion GVW of 4005kg meaning they require D1 entitlement to drive as a minibus.

 

What is a lightweight minibus?2022-05-26T13:20:53+00:00

Lightweight minibuses, sometimes called minibus lights, are minibuses weighing under 3.5 tonnes that can be driven on a standard car licence. Currently, there is not a 17 seat minibus on the market with a GVW of 3500kg or under. Before you commit to a minibus you intend to drive without D1 entitlement check that the GVW is 3500kg or under – NOT including any specialist equipment.

How many Section 19 Permits do you need?2022-05-26T13:21:06+00:00

Section 19 Permits are in the name of the organisation that applied for them, not a specific minibus so they can be moved from minibus to minibus, but they cannot be shared.  They are displayed in the front windscreen of a vehicle like the old-style tax disk.

If a minibus is loaded to a different organisation, they will need their own Section 19 Permit, even if it’s only for a short time.

Can minibus safety inspections be completed at school?2022-05-26T13:21:19+00:00

Yes, unlike a service or MOT a minibus safety inspection can be completed onsite by a mobile engineer. Castle Minibus are the UK’s leading provider of minibus safety inspections, having completed over 10,000 in 2021 with two mobile engineer partner organisations. Minibus safety inspections are a requirement under a Section 19 Permit and details of maintenance arrangements including a copy of an agreement/contract are required when applying for a permit.

How long does a minibus safety inspection take?2022-05-26T13:21:36+00:00

A minibus safety inspection should take around 45 minutes and includes the removal of the wheels to check tyres and brakes. The engineer will complete a checklist that they leave with the school identifying any issues, or potential issues. The engineer completing the check will not/should not complete any remedial work. It is recommended that minibus safety inspections be completed by an independent engineer who is not also responsible for service and MOT.

What paperwork is required for minibus safety inspections?2022-05-26T13:21:45+00:00

The DVSA requires holders of a Section 19 Permit to have a 6-month plan of their minibus maintenance schedule that includes services, MOT and minibus safety inspections. On completion of the inspection, the engineer will provide a copy of the inspection checklist that organisations are required to keep for 15 months. When applying for a Section 19 Permit (new or renewal) details of your vehicle maintenance arrangements are required including contracts/agreements from your safety inspections provider.

Who needs DVSA minibus safety inspections?2022-05-26T13:21:56+00:00

If you are operating a minibus under a Section 19 Permit or PSV Operators licence, you will require minibus safety inspections every 10 weeks for vehicles under 12 years old (every 6 weeks for vehicles 12 years+). These checks are regardless of milage, or use of the vehicle and the paperwork must be kept for 15 months.

Is a minibus safety inspection the same as a daily or weekly check?2022-05-26T13:22:16+00:00

A minibus safety inspection is not the same as a daily or weekly check as it needs to be completed by a qualified engineer and includes a thorough inspection. A daily or weekly check also called a walk around check is completed by drivers before they take the vehicles on the road to ensure there aren’t any obvious issues with the minibus, such as a bald tyre.

Who can complete a minibus safety inspection?2022-05-26T13:22:27+00:00

A minibus safety inspection is not the same as a walk-around check and has to be completed by a qualified engineer that can certify the vehicle is roadworthy. It is recommended that these safety inspections are completed by an independent engineer to identify any issues to potential failings – repair work can then be completed, but not as part of the inspection. The DVSA recommends that these inspections are completed every 10 weeks for vehicles under 12 years old, regardless of mileage or how often they are used.

What are DVSA minibus inspections?2022-05-26T13:22:41+00:00

The DVSA updated its guidance in 2017 recommending that minibus safety inspections should be completed every 10 weeks for vehicles under 12 years old, and every 6 weeks for those over 12 years of age. These inspections are required to prove roadworthiness and are a condition of the Section 19 Permit and Operators’ licence. They are in addition to services and MOTs.

Is a minibus safety inspection the same as a service?2022-05-26T13:22:52+00:00

No, a minibus safety inspection is different to a regular service, and both are required, along with an MOT, to ensure roadworthiness. It is recommended by the DVSA that a minibus safety inspection is completed every 10 weeks for vehicles under 12 years old and that it is carried out by an independent qualified engineer – not the same engineer that completes the MOT and service.

How often do you need a minibus safety inspection?2022-05-26T13:23:01+00:00

The DVSA recommends that minibus safety inspections are completed every 10 weeks for vehicles of 12 years and under, regardless of mileage, and every 6 weeks for vehicles 12 years+. These checks are as well as regular servicing and MOTs

What is a minibus safety inspection?2022-05-26T13:23:09+00:00

A minibus safety inspection is a thorough check completed by a qualified engineer to ensure that the vehicle is roadworthy. Minibus Safety Inspections are required under both a Section 19 Permit and PSV Operator’s licence every 10 weeks for vehicles under 12 years old – as recommended by the DVSA, regardless of mileage.

What are the coach minibus safety inspection intervals?2022-05-26T13:23:39+00:00

The DVSA recommend that Minibus Safety Inspections are completed every 10 weeks for vehicles less than 12 years old, and every 6 weeks for vehicles over 12 years. This is regardless of milage.

For more information visit DVSA Guide to Roadworthiness

 

What is a minibus safety check sheet template?2022-05-26T13:23:49+00:00

A minibus safety check sheet can be used to complete daily minibus checks. This checklist should be completed by the driver and include fundamentals like lights and indicators, tyre tread and fixings, windscreen wipers and washers, including fluid levels, the horn, warning lights, fuel and oil leaks, exterior body condition, brakes, steering, mirrors and glass, doors and exits, interior, first aid kit and fire extinguisher. These checks are to ensure there are no issues and that the vehicle is fit for the journey.

Castle Minibus has a free minibus safety checklist app that drivers can download with a 12-point and 40-point checklist that they can then send to their designated transport manager.

What are Minibus Safety Inspections?2022-02-15T11:25:03+00:00

Minibus safety inspections are required if you operate under a Section 19 Permit. The DVSA recommends safety inspections every 10 weeks, or 6 weeks for vehicles over 12 years old, regardless of mileage. These checks are in addition to regular services and MOTs but it is recommended you use an independent engineer for safety inspections.

Castle Minibus offer minibus safety inspections to schools and organisations across the UK. Our mobile engineers come to your school to complete these checks and leave you with the relevant paperwork that needs to be filed and kept for at least 15 months.

What are minibus safety checks?2022-02-15T11:40:48+00:00

There are two types of minibus safety checks that schools or organisations operating under a Section 19 Permit need to be aware of.

Daily minibus safety checks, sometimes called walk-around checks,  should be carried out by drivers to ensure there are no problems with the vehicle and it is ready and fit for the journey. Castle Minibus have a free minibus checklist app that drivers can download with a 12-point and 40-point checklist that they can then send to their designated transport manager.

Watch a video from Castle Minibus of how to complete a daily minibus safety check

Minibus Safety inspections are required under a Section 19 Permit in addition to regular services and MOTs. These checks need to be completed by a qualified engineer and the DVSA recommend they are completed every 10 weeks ( 6 weeks for vehicles over 12 years old) regardless of mileage.

 

What are minibus 10-week safety checks?2022-05-26T13:24:42+00:00

If you operate your vehicles under a Section 19 Permit you are required to have a minibus safety inspection, or check, every 10 weeks ( 6 weeks for vehicles over 12 years old) regardless of mileage. These checks need to be completed by a qualified engineer and are as well as regular services and MOTs but it is recommended you use an independent engineer for safety inspections.

What is a minibus safety inspection checklist?2022-06-27T15:44:25+00:00

A minibus safety inspection checklist is what engineers complete when they do a safety inspection. This checklist lets the school know if there are any problems with the vehicle. Minibus Safety Inspections are required under a Section 19 Permit and need to be completed by a qualified engineer every 10 weeks (or 6 weeks for vehicles over 12 years old) regardless of mileage.

Owners of minibuses also need to complete daily/weekly checks to ensure the vehicles are ready to be driven, and there are no faults or issues. Castle Minibus has a free minibus safety checklist app that drivers can download with a 12-point and 40-point checklist that they can then send to their designated transport manager to be managed and filed.

 

Section 19 permits rather than PSV permits2022-05-26T13:25:02+00:00

You can apply for a Section 19 Permit instead of a full PSV Operators Licence if you want to run minibuses for reward or hire but not profit from their operation. Your organisation/school must meet certain criteria, such as being not-for-profit or having charitable status.  A Section 19 Permit allows you to charge to cover the costs of running vehicles and allows drivers with standard car licences to drive vehicles under 3500kg provided they meet certain criteria. D1 is the entitlement drivers need on their driving licence to drive a minibus over 3500kg and be paid for doing so under a Section 19 Permit.

Section 19 Permit Requirements2022-05-26T13:25:11+00:00

The Section 19 Permit replaces the need for a full PSV Operator’s Licence that commercial companies must have. The Section 19 Permit has several requirements. The permit holder still has the responsibility of making sure their transport services are operated within the law, that vehicles are properly maintained, and drivers have the appropriate licences. In the Section 19 Permit application form, you are required to complete details on the providers of maintenance including who is providing your safety inspections and their frequency with proof of this. agreement.

Section 19 permit bus lanes2022-05-26T13:25:21+00:00

Regardless of whether a minibus is operating under a Section 19 Permit the signage for the bus lanes will indicate whether you can drive a minibus in the bus lane.

A bus is defined as being a vehicle with 9 passenger seats or more and can be driven in most bus lanes unless the bus lane sign says ‘local’ which means that the bus lane is reserved for local services. The sign may also indicate what other vehicles can use the bus lane such as motorcycles or licenced taxis.

Bus lane signage

If this sign is displayed you can drive a minibus in the bus lane

Lcal bus lane sign

This sign shows that the bus lane is reserved for local services. You can not drive a minibus in this bus lane.

 

Driving a minibus on section 19 permit2022-05-26T13:25:32+00:00

If you are driving a minibus on a Section 19 Permit you can a vehicle with up to 16 seats on a standard car licence as long as you meet certain conditions; You must not be driving for reward or hire, you must be over 21 and have been driving to two years and the minibus GVW must not exceed 3500kg (4250kg with specialist disabled access equipment). If you have D1 entitlement you can be paid to drive the minibus and drive a vehicle over 3500kg.

Driver CPC requirement section 19 permit?2022-05-26T13:25:50+00:00

There is no CPC requirement under a Section 19 Permit. CPC (Certificate of Professional Competence) is 35 hours of traditional training that is compulsory over 5 years to qualify for your Driver Qualification Card.

What is a section 19 small bus permit?2022-05-26T13:25:58+00:00

A Section 19 small bus permit allows schools and organisations that provide passenger transport for non-commercial purposes to operate transport services for hire or reward without the need for a full public service vehicle (PSV) operator’s licence. The permit holder still has the responsibility of making sure the transport services are operated within the law, that vehicles are properly maintained, and drivers have the appropriate licences.

Where to send section 19 permit application?2022-05-26T13:26:09+00:00

To apply for a Section 19 Permit visit https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/application-for-a-standard-or-large-bus-permit-psv372 and follow the link to complete the form. You can then either complete the form in full electronically and submit all supporting documentation to permits@otc.gov.uk or you can print the form and complete with black ink and post with all the required supporting evidence to: Office  of  the  Traffic  Commissioner Hillcrest  House 386 Harehills  Lane Leeds LS9 6NF

When do I need a Section 19 Permit?2022-05-26T13:26:21+00:00

You need a Section 19 Permit to operate a minibus if you do not have a PSV Operator’s licence. If you are not-for-profit or charity-status schools or organisation, you can apply to your local the Traffic Commissioner for a Permit provided you are not looking to profit from your vehicles or carry the general public.

What is a Section 19 Permit scheme?2022-05-26T13:26:29+00:00

The Section 19 Permit ‘scheme’ replaces the need for a full PSV Operator’s Licence that commercial companies must have to run vehicles with a view to profit. Not-for-profit or charity-status schools and organisations apply to the Traffic Commissioner for a Section 19 Permit which allows them to charge to cover the costs of their vehicle and also allows drivers with standard car licences to drive vehicles up to 3500kg provided they meet certain criteria.

What colour are section 19 permits?2022-05-26T13:26:39+00:00

A section 19 Permit is a purple and white circular paper disk with serrated edges that resembles the old-style tax disks. One needs to be displayed in the windscreen of each minibus.

A section 19 permit - a small disk that is displayed in the minibus windscreen

A section 19 permit – a small purple disk that is displayed in the minibus windscreen

How long does Section 19 Permit take?2022-05-26T13:26:52+00:00

Please note Section 19 Permit applications are taking about 2 months, due to the amount of incomplete and incorrect applications, if you haven’t included a safety inspection contract (max 13 weeks), please do so now, to prevent further delays.

Also, your fee will be taken earlier, but this does not mean it has been processed, please do not chase sooner as this will cause further delays.

This information was sent from permits@otc.gov.uk on 31st January 2022

How long does a section 19 permit last?2022-05-26T13:27:01+00:00

A Section 19 Permit is valid for 5 years and then needs to be replaced. You do not need a permit if the vehicle is ‘off-road’. You need to inform the DVSA or the designated body that issued your permit of any changes such as the change of name of your organisation, as your permit will need to be replaced (this includes changing to Academy status). Permits can not be altered by hand and must be replaced if too faded to read clearly.

Does a school minibus need a section 19 permit?2022-05-26T13:27:14+00:00

Each school minibus requires a Section 19 Permit if the school does not operate under a PSV Operators licence, required for commercial passenger vehicles. A Section 19 Permit replaces the PSV Operator’s Licence for schools and not-for-profit organisations who are not looking to profit from their transport.

Do you need a section 19 permit?2022-05-26T13:27:25+00:00

You need a Section 19 Permit if you are a school or not-for-profit or charitable-status organisation that wishes to charges to cover the costs of your minibuses/vehicles but not profit from them. If you wish to carry the general public or make a profit from your minibuses/vehicles then you need a full PSV Operator’s Licence.

Do schools need a section 19 permit?2022-02-15T09:21:32+00:00

Schools need a Section 19 Permit if they want to operate their vehicles for reward or hire but not profit from them avoiding the need for a full PSV Operators Licence. A Section 19 Permit allows not-for-profit and charitable-status schools and organisations to cover the costs of running their vehicles and allows drivers with standard car licences to drive vehicles under 3500kg provided they meet certain criteria.

Do I need a section 19 permit with D12022-02-15T12:59:37+00:00

D1 is the entitlement you need on your driving licence to drive a minibus over a certain weight. A Section 19 Permit allows not-for-profit or charitable-status schools and organisations to run their minibuses without a full PSV Operators Licence – required for commercial companies looking to profit from their transport services.

Under a Section 19 Permit you can drive a minibus without D1 entitlement provided the vehicle is under 3500kg (or 4250kg with specialist access equipment), you are over 21 and you are not driving for ‘reward or hire’. If you have D1 entitlement, or D1 (101) inherited entitlement you can still drive the vehicle under a Section 19 Permit and be paid for doing so – provided the school/organisation is not profiting from the vehicle. If the organisation does not have a Section 19 Permit drivers require a full D1 licence to drive a minibus as well as CPC training.

Do I have a Section 19 Permit2022-05-26T13:27:38+00:00

If you have a Section 19 Permit you will find it displayed on the windscreen of your minibus or vehicle like the old-style paper-tax disk. They look very similar. There is no list to check whether your school/organisation has a permit already, but you need one for each vehicle. Check with your local traffic commissioner if you are unsure.

A section 19 permit - a small disk that is displayed in the minibus windscreen

A section 19 permit – a small disk that is displayed in the minibus windscreen

What is a section 19 permit?2022-02-15T13:02:38+00:00

A Section 19 Permit is a small paper disk issued by the traffic commissioner to not-for-profit or charity-status schools and organisations that do not seek to profit from their vehicles. The Section 19 Permit replaces the need for a full PSV Operator’s Licence that commercial companies must have. Issued by the traffic commissioner one permit is required for each vehicle and is valid for 5 years.

Do I need a section 19 permit?2022-05-26T13:28:16+00:00

Schools or organisations that wish to run their minibuses/vehicles for reward or hire but without a full PSV operator’s licence need to have a Section 19 Permit. These permits are issued only to schools and organisations that are not-for-profit or have charitable status and are not looking to profit from any aspect of their minibuses.

Where can I read more about vehicle safety inspections?2022-05-26T13:28:29+00:00
Do I need to keep records of my safety inspections?2022-05-26T13:28:54+00:00

Yes, you need to not only keep records that these inspections are completed for 15 months but also have 6-month plan in place for MOTs, services and inspections.

How long does a safety inspection last?2022-05-26T13:29:07+00:00

A proper safety inspection should take 45-60 mins.

Do the 6 or 10 week safety inspection replace the daily walk-around checks?2022-05-26T13:29:17+00:00

No, these checks are in addition to the daily walk around checks, MOTs and services.

Who can complete a minibus safety inspection?2022-05-26T13:29:28+00:00

A ‘qualified’ engineer needs to complete your safety inspections and ideally it should not be the engineer that complete services and MOTs. If an issue is identified this should not be resolved as part of the inspection.

Why do we need regular safety inspections?2021-09-01T14:52:59+00:00

They are a requirement under a Section 19 Permit in addition to MOTs and services. Recommended every 10 weeks (regardless of milage) for minibuses under 12 years old and every 6 weeks for vehicles 12 years and older.

Do I need a D1 to drive a minibus2022-05-26T13:29:43+00:00

You can drive a minibus without a D1 or D1 entitlement but there are some restrictions.

A full D1 licence requires medical and eyesight checks as well as a theory and practical test. You may have D1 entitlement on your car licence if your licence was issued before January 1997. This entitles you to drive a minibus without the conditions required for those with a standard car licence.

If you are driving for a commercial company that is operating under a PSV Operators’ licence you need a full D1 licence as well as further training. If the minibuses are being run by a not-for-profit company or one that has charitable status they operate under a Section 19 Permit which is issued by the DVSA, in lieu of an operator’s licence.

Under a Section 19 Permit drivers must meet certain conditions to drive a minibus on a standard B car licence.
they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
no trailer is being towed
where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.
For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

If drivers want to drive a minibus with a GVW of over 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment), drive abroad, tow a trailer or be paid to drive a minibus, under a Section 19 Permit, they need D1 entitlement.

If you are a teacher and are driving a minibus without D1 entitlement, make sure you meet the conditions listed above and you can drive a minibus on a standard car licence.

How old do you have to be to drive a minibus?2022-05-26T13:29:53+00:00

You need to be 21 to drive a minibus.

To drive a minibus on a car licence, under a Section 19 Permit, one of the conditions you must meet is to be over 21. You must also have been driving for more than two years.

To apply for a D1 licence to drive a minibus over 3.5 tonnes, the minimum age requirement is 21.

Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public. So, if you are a teacher or member of staff you need to be 21 or over to drive any size vehicle, including an 8 passenger car, that some might consider a minibus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can I drive a minibus on a car licence?2022-05-26T13:30:06+00:00

Yes, you can drive a minibus on a car licence, but you need to make sure the vehicle you are driving has a weight of under 3.5 tonnes (if your licence was issued after January 1997 and doesn’t include D1 (101) entitlement) and that the vehicle has a Section 19 Permit.

Under a Section 19 Permit you can drive a minibus with a MAM (Maximum Authorised Mass) or GVW (gross vehicle weight) of under 3.5 tonnes on a standard car licence. There is an additional allowance for specialist equipment for disabled passengers of 750kg but this allowance is ONLY for that equipment.

Vehicles under this weight limit, that can be driven on a car licence include the new Euro 6 Ford Transit factory-built 12 seat minibus and the Euro 5 Ford Transit 14 seat minibus or some converted 15 seat minibuses, such as the Citroen Relay.

Under a Section 19 Permit there are some conditions drivers must meet when driving a minibus on a car licence.

  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

 If drivers want to drive a minibus with a GVW of over 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment) they must have a D1 entitlement. If your driving licence was issued before January 1997 and has 101 in the D1 column on the back of your licence, then you can drive minibuses without the weight restriction. Otherwise, you will need to take the D1 driving test to get that entitlement.

Can I drive a 8 or 9 seater minibus on a car licence2022-05-26T13:30:31+00:00

You can drive an 8 seater minibus on a car licence with no other considerations, if you are doing so privately. It is not considered to be a small bus, or minibus. That size of vehicle is classed as a ‘small vehicle’ adapted to carry 8 passengers or fewer.

There are conditions and restrictions on driving these types of vehicles if it is not your private vehicle. If you are driving for an organisation or as part of your employment there may be some restrictions on who can drive these vehicles, such as needing to be over 21 and having had your licence for over two years, but you still only need a standard car licence.

An organisation that accepts any sort of payment for providing transport to passengers must hold either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence and driver must hold the full D1 licence and complete annual CPC training. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles can’t be used to carry members of the general public. Section 19 Permit replaces the need for a PSV Operators and/or PHV licence.

Under a Section 19 Permit drivers of small vehicles, such as teachers or school staff, adapted to carry 8 or fewer passenger must be over 21 and have held a full standard car licence for at least 2 years. Drivers can be paid for driving a small vehicle under a section 19 permit.

You are likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole.

Vehicles adapted to carry 8 or fewer passengers are only considered to be Public Service Vehicles if passengers are being charged separate fares in the course of the business of carrying passengers. This means that if you use a small vehicle you must charge separate fares. The vehicle must not be available for hire as a whole. You’re likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole. In these cases you should contact your local council, which is responsible for licensing private hire vehicle operations, for advice.

 

What licence do I need to drive a minibus for hire and reward?2022-05-26T13:30:44+00:00

You need at least D1 entitlement on your standard car licence or a full D1 licence to drive a minibus for hire and reward under a Section 19 Permit, or a full D1 licence and further CPC training if you are driving a minibus for a commercial company looking to profit from their minibus operations and carry the general public.

Under a Section 19 Permit you can drive for reward or hire with D1 (101) entitlement included on a standard car licence issued before 1st January 1997. On the back of your licence in the D1 row you will see (101). This entitles you to drive a minibus under a Section 19 Permit and be paid to do so. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public.

If you are being paid to drive for a commercial company you will need a full D1 licence, that requires medical and eyesight, theory and practical tests. Commercial companies need to apply for both a minibus provisional entitlement, also known as a passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) licence and a public service vehicle (PSV) operator licence. Drivers will also need to complete 35 hours of additional CPC training.  You must have the full Driver CPC if you drive a lorry, bus or coach as the main part of your job. You usually need to pass 4 tests to get it, unless you have ‘acquired rights’ because of your existing driving experience.

You do not need the full Driver CPC if you do not want to drive for a living, for example you want to drive for a hobby or carry passengers or goods non-commercially for personal use.

For more information visit. https://www.gov.uk/become-lorry-bus-driver

Licence to drive a minibus2022-05-26T13:30:55+00:00

The type of licence you need to drive a minibus depends on whether the vehicle is being driven for profit, whether you are being paid to drive and on the weight of the vehicle.

Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public.

There are several conditions drivers must meet to drive a minibus on a standard car licence under a Section 19 Permit.

  • they are over 21
  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

So, if you are a volunteer driver, who is over 21 and has driven for over 2 years you can drive a minibus under 3.5 tonnes on a standard car licence under a Section 19 Permit.

If you cannot meet the conditions above you need a D1 licence or D1 entitlement on your car licence. If your standard car licence was issued before 1st January 1997 it will have D1 (101) entitlement on that licence. If not, you need to take a theory and practical test to obtain a D1 licence.  With a D1 entitlement you can drive a vehicle over 3.5 tonnes, and you can be paid to do so, even under a Section 19 Permit.

Companies profiting from transport or carrying members of the general public must have either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence and a full D1 licence and CPC training is required for all drivers.

What licence do I need to drive a minibus?2022-05-26T13:31:08+00:00

There are two types of licence you can drive a minibus with; a standard (B) car licence and a D1 licence. Knowing which one you need depends  1. the weight of the vehicle 2. whether you are being paid to drive and 3. whether the vehicle is being driven for profit.

A standard (B) car licence allows you to drive a minibus operated not-for-profit, under a Section 19 Permit, as long as you meet certain conditions, the main ones being; that drivers are over 21 and have been driving for more than 2 years, that the gross weight (GVW) of the vehicle is under 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with specialist equipment) and that drivers receive no payment or other consideration.

The GVW or MAM is the weight of a vehicle including the maximum load (passengers, driver, luggage) that can be carried safely when it is being used on the road. This is also known as the permissible maximum weight and it is what dictates whether drivers need D1 entitlement.

You can find the weight, sometimes also called the plated weight on the chassis plate or VIN plate that is usually in the door frame, under the bonnet or in a front foot well. It looks like the image below. The MAM is always the second largest weight, in this case, 4100.

Minibus Weight

If you cannot meet these conditions you need a D1 licence or D1 entitlement on your car licence. If your standard car licence was issued before 1st January 1997 it will have D1 (101) entitlement on that licence. If not, you need to take a theory and practical test to obtain a D1 licence.  With D1 entitlement you can drive a vehicle over 3.5 tonnes and you can be paid to do so, even under a Section 19 Permit.

Companies profiting from transport or carrying members of the general public must have either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence and a full D1 licence and CPC training is required for all drivers.

For more information on the conditions required to drive a minibus under a Section 19 Permit visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

 

Can I drive a 9 seater on a car licence?2022-05-26T13:31:23+00:00

You can drive a 9-seater on a standard car licence if you are doing so privately, as that size of vehicle is considered to be a ‘small vehicle’ adapted to carry 8 passengers or fewer. It is not considered to be a small bus, or minibus.

There are conditions and restrictions on driving these types of vehicles if it is not your private vehicle. If you are driving for an organisation, or as part of your employment, there may be some restrictions on who can drive these vehicles, such as needing to be over 21 and having had your licence for over two years, but you still only need a standard car licence.

An organisation that accepts any sort of payment for providing transport to passengers must hold either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence. A Section 19 Permit replaces the need for a PSV or PHV licence. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. There is no need for a PSV or PHV licence with a Section 19 Permit. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public.

Under a Section 19 Permit drivers of small vehicles, such as teachers or school staff, adapted to carry 8 passengers or less must be over 21 and have held a full standard car licence for at least 2 years. Drivers can be paid for driving a small vehicle under a Section 19 Permit.

You are likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole.

Vehicles adapted to carry 8 or fewer passengers are only considered to be Public Service Vehicles if passengers are being charged separate fares in the course of the business of carrying passengers. This means that if you use a small vehicle you must charge separate fares. The vehicle must not be available for hire as a whole. You’re likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole. In these cases you should contact your local council, which is responsible for licensing private hire vehicle operations, for advice.

Can I drive a 17 seater minibus?2022-05-26T13:31:43+00:00

If you have a standard car licence, are over 21 and have been driving for more than two years, and are not driving for reward or hire, you can drive a 17-seater minibus with a GVW of under 3.5 tonnes under a Section 19 Permit.

If you have a full D1 licence or a D1 (101) entitlement on your licence, because your licence was issued before 1st January 1997, you can drive a 17-seater minibus without having to meet the conditions below, outlined for standard car licence holders.

Under a Section 19 Permit there are some conditions drivers must meet when driving a minibus with a car licence.

  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

Finding the GVW or MAM of your 17 seater minibus

The MAM is the weight of a vehicle including the maximum load (passengers, driver, luggage) that can be carried safely when it is being used on the road. This is also known as the gross vehicle weight (GVW) or permissible maximum weight and it is what dictates whether drivers need D1 entitlement.

You can find the weight, sometimes also called the plated weight on the chassis plate or VIN plate that is usually in the door frame, under the bonnet or in a front foot well. It looks like the image below. The MAM is always the second largest weight, in this case, 4100.

 

Who can drive a minibus?2022-05-26T13:31:54+00:00

Anyone with a standard car licence can drive a minibus under a Section 19 Permit as long as they meet certain conditions;

  • they’re 21 or older
  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used

 

If the minibus is over 3.5 tonnes or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment you can only drive this vehicle if you have D1 entitlement. Either by an inherited D1 (101) entitlement on licences issued before 1st January 1997 or by taking the full D1 theory and practical test.

 

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

 

Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. This means that if you are a volunteer driver or not driving for reward or hire you can drive a minibus.

 

There is some legal ambiguity as to what constitutes reward or hire when it comes to minibus drivers who are driving minibuses on a car licence as part of their employment, like teachers for example (this does not apply where the driver has D1 entitlement).

 

The NASWUT National Union of Teachers states: ‘Whether a teacher may be deemed to be driving a minibus for hire and reward because they are being paid a salary as a teacher is unclear, and advice on this point is contradictory, except in Northern Ireland.

 

The NASUWT strongly asserts that, particularly but not exclusively due to the ambiguity around the hire/reward status, the full D1 licence is the minimum requirement, and a car licence is insufficient in all circumstances. If schools wish to train minibus drivers to D1 level, the costs of any training and testing for the D1 licence must be covered in full by the employer.’

 

www.nasuwt.org.uk/advice/health-safety/minibus-guidance.html

 

Can you drive a minibus on a car licence?2022-05-26T13:32:05+00:00

Under a Section 19 Permit you can drive a minibus with a MAM (Maximum Authorised Mass) or GVW (gross vehicle weight) of under 3.5 tonnes on a standard car licence.

There is an additional allowance for specialist equipment for disabled passengers of 750kg but this allowance is ONLY for that equipment.

Vehicles under this weight limit, that can be driven on a car licence include the new Euro 6 Ford Transit factory-built 12 seat minibus and the Euro 5 Ford Transit 14 seat minibus, or some converted 15 seat minibuses, such as the Citroen Relay.

Under a Section 19 Permit there are some conditions drivers must meet when driving a minibus on a car licence.

  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

 If drivers want to drive a minibus with a GVW of over 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment) they must have D1 entitlement. If your driving licence was issued before January 1997 and has 101 in the D1 column on the back of your licence, then you can drive minibuses without the weight restriction. Otherwise, you will need to take the D1 driving test to get that entitlement.

Can I drive a 9 seater minibus on a car licence?2022-05-26T13:32:16+00:00

You can drive a 9-seater minibus on a standard car licence as that size of vehicle is considered to be a ‘small vehicle’ adapted to carry 8 passengers or fewer, not including the driver. It is not considered to be a minibus.

There are conditions and restrictions on driving these types of vehicles if it is not your private vehicle. If you are driving for an organisation or as part of your employment there are some restrictions on who can drive these vehicles, such as needing to be over 21 and having had your licence for over two years, but you still only need a standard car licence.

An organisation that accepts any sort of payment for providing transport to passengers must hold either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public.

Under a Section 19 Permit drivers of small vehicles adapted to carry 8 or fewer passengers must have held a full licence authorising the driving of vehicles in category B (cars) for at least 2 years and they must be 21 or over. Drivers can be paid for driving a small vehicle under a section 19 permit.

You’re likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole.

Vehicles adapted to carry 8 or fewer passengers are only considered to be Public Service Vehicles if passengers are being charged separate fares in the course of the business of carrying passengers. This means that if you use a small vehicle you must charge separate fares. The vehicle must not be available for hire as a whole. You’re likely to need a private hire vehicle licence if you do hire the vehicle as a whole. In these cases you should contact your local council, which is responsible for licensing private hire vehicle operations, for advice.

Can I drive a minibus?2022-05-26T13:32:26+00:00

If you are not being paid to drive or are driving for a charity or not-for-profit organisation, have a standard car licence, are over 21 and have been driving for over two years you can drive a minibus under a certain weight.

If you have a full D1 licence, or a D1 101 entitlement on your licence (check the back of licences issued before 1st Jan 1997) you can drive a minibus with less restrictions.

Charities or not-for-profit organisations can operate their minibuses under a Section 19 Permit which allows drivers to drive on a standard car licence if the following conditions are being met.

  • they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
  • they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
  • the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
  • for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
  • no trailer is being towed
  • where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used
  • Drivers aged 70 or over who don’t meet the higher medical standards are not authorised to drive small buses. They can drive small vehicles being used under a permit, provided they have renewed their car licence.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

If drivers want to drive a minibus with a weight over 3.5 tonnes (or 4.25 tonnes with the allowance for specialist equipment) they must have D1 entitlement. If your driving licence was issued before January 1997 and has 101 in the D1 column on the back of your licence then you can drive minibuses without the weight restriction. Otherwise, you will need to take the D1 driving test to get that entitlement.

An organisation that accepts any sort of payment for providing transport to passengers must hold either a PSV ‘O’ licence or a private hire vehicle (PHV) licence. Section 19 Permits are issued by the DVSA to organisations that operate vehicles without a view to profit to transport their members, or people whom the organisation exists to help, such as school pupils. Section 19 permit vehicles cannot be used to carry members of the general public. A Section 19 Permit replaces the need for a PSV or PHV licence.

Can I re-invite a driver if they haven’t received my invitation email?2022-05-26T13:32:44+00:00

Yes. For privacy, we don’t make available the details of the driver to the STM until they have accepted the invitation. If you want to re-invite the driver you select the “Invite a Driver” button as normal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I can’t log in to the App2022-05-26T13:32:50+00:00

Please check the following:

  1. Has your STM actually invited you yet? The App can be downloaded at anytime but you have to be invited by your STM (School Transport Manager) before you can use it.
  2. Have you received your Activation email and completed registration? Please check your SPAM folder if not.
  3. Do you have internet connection via WiFi or Mobile Network? You need some sort of internet connection so STRIDA can validate your account.
Can I be both an STM and a Driver?2020-01-13T09:51:25+00:00

Yes. Please select “Make me a Driver” in your Driver page of your STM Dashboard.

 

 

 

 

I can’t log in to my STM Dashboard2020-01-13T10:04:44+00:00

As an STM the login you created is for both your STM Dashboard and your APP. If you can’t remember your login please reset it here.

Password Reset
I can’t see any details on my STM Dasboard2020-01-12T09:14:05+00:00

This may be because you have just registered but you are not yet activated. If you don’t receive your activation email, please check your SPAM folder. If it is not there please let us know at compliance@castleminibus.co.uk and we will activate you. Please make sure you use the same email as the one you registered with when sending emails to us.

D1 Testimonial2019-05-14T13:35:15+00:00

Hi

MCC TESTIMONIAL2019-05-14T13:34:39+00:00

Hi

Service Excellence

We understand what pressures teachers, school business managers, school governors and bursars are under, and what is involved in operating a minibus for a school. All our services are tailored to make your life easier.

  • Covid-19 safe for collections and deliveries

  • Online and practical driver risks assessment

  • Eco-efficient minibuses with additional safety specifications

  • Low deposit and minimal cash outlay

  • Safety inspections completed onsite by independent qualified engineers

  • Flexible short-term hire solutions

  • Vehicle logo and livery completed before delivery

  • Hassle-free minibus leasing including maintenance

  • The UK’s only Minibus Compliance Course (MCC) recognised by RoSPA

  • Help to reduce insurance premiums with Minibus Compliance Course

  • Keeping you compliant

Talk to Castle Minibus today

We would be delighted to answer any questions you have and provide a no obligation quote and visit to your setting, with a demonstration minibus if required, at a time most convenient to you.

General Contact
Consent *
reCAPTCHA
Go to Top